Learning about 3D Printing/Milling

Post questions, share ideas and techniques relating to 3D prototyping and milling
Post Reply
User avatar
Ed_Max
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 5:46 pm

Learning about 3D Printing/Milling

Post by Ed_Max » Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:56 pm

Dear All,

I hope this is a good place to write this, as I am not ready for a door to door salesman trying to sell me the wrong thing.

I am Ed a retired craftsperson with a lathe and manual mill. Now I have some time, I trying learn about 3d printing and milling. I can make drawings on paper and make parts with my skills. A few months ago I started learning the 123 Design on the other half's iPad, so have some idea I need to draw in 3D. I have a bit of a way to go but hope to buy something before this coming Christmas.

There is so much in the news and it is so confusing. I think I want to make small artistic models that I can make a master and then make a silicone rubber mould to cast many parts from, like the pumpkins I saw on one of these pages. That is unless your machines make silicone parts.

Do I need a printer or a mill. My son plays a Roland piano, so we know your name, but did not know you made these things.

I look forward to anyones help or advice you can spare.

Thank you in anticipation.

Ed

User avatar
Andrew Dudley
Gold Member
Posts: 438
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 10:04 am
Location: Clevedon - England
Contact:

Re: Learning about 3D Printing/Milling

Post by Andrew Dudley » Fri Nov 07, 2014 9:57 am

Hi Ed, Welcome to the forum.

You are absolutly correct, there is a lot of 'hype' out there about 3D printing, and rightly so to some deegree. It has enabled a lot of designers and engineers to prototype their parts or components, and reduce the time it takes from concetp to final product. This time is the major cost reducer in the design stage and also it help keep companies ahead of the game and allow them to react quickly to rapid changes in demand.
The way I would suggest that you look at it from a balenced point of view is that a 3D printer is a tool. Like you have a tool box for your DIY activities, maybe a hammer, saw, screwdriver etc. Each tool has it's uses, but you wouldn't necessarily use a hammer to cut a piece of wood. You need more than one tool to do all the job's that may arrise over the years, and when you get a new problem that you don't have a tool for, well you go out and buy one from the local hardware store.
The one thing I would say is that each 3D printer is different, and you need to pick the one that will do the job you need it to do. If you are making small electrical housings, you don't want a 3D printer that can only print body parts for example.

So OK, just going out and buying a 3D printer is not the same as getting a nice shiny new drill, you need to know how to use it and what for, as you have done you need some way to design what you want to print, and this is done in the CAD (Computer Aided Design) software like your 123 Design on the iPad. NB - Not all designs can be 3D printed. The machines have limitation after all.

But 3D printing is not the only way you can create an object from a computer drawing. There are other creative devices that can make things you need like milling machines, cutters, engravers and printers.

Regarding your small models, a Steriolithography machine like our ARM-10 would be a good start, as these produce high detailed models at a small scale, and have a degree of leniency over what objects you put in them. You see not all 3D files can be 3D printed correctly, or at least the way you want them. We also do 3D milling and engraving machines, so what sort or models are you looking at making? If you can show a picture, or a link to something similar please share.
Andrew Dudley
Business Manager - 3D & Dental
Roland DG (UK) Ltd
Web: www.rolanddg.co.uk

User avatar
Ed_Max
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 5:46 pm

Re: Learning about 3D Printing/Milling

Post by Ed_Max » Sat Nov 08, 2014 6:42 pm

Hi Andrew,

Thank you for your description.

As I have limited tools, my shapes have been a bit basic, but friends like them. We have made a couple of pictures from the CAD and added them below of a similar model I have made. They are about 55mm long.

Parts like this I make from wood as it easily obtained. I made the body and wheels on the lathe, then the wings etc on my mill, trying to make them the same size is difficult manually. Then they are sanded, assembled and painted and or varnished.

I would like to refine these designs with more detail, a little bit like an airfix model, but not that detailed. I would like to make little head and shoulder people to be part of the toys, but do not how to draw them. Of course you can buy these online but not always in the sizes and shapes you want.

With further online reading some 3D printers seem to have a lot of coloured materials. Is this the case with your ARM printer.

Could the SRM make some parts as well. Can the software decide if to use the ARM or SRM for the best results and make the parts fit together.

Ed
plane1.JPG
plane2.JPG

User avatar
Patrick Thorn
Gold Member
Posts: 305
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:19 am
Location: Staines
Contact:

Re: Learning about 3D Printing/Milling

Post by Patrick Thorn » Thu Nov 13, 2014 8:46 pm

Hi Ed,

This weeks been busy and Andrew is now off for a couple of days.

Making parts symmetrical and the same size every time is the bonus of using digital tech. So from your CAD you can mill parts from all sorts of materials with the SRM-20 in fine detail, however, making things like people heads and complex geometry from all sides is more suited to the ARM-10 as it prints and then you can paint it afterwards. We have users making model trains and planes with fine detailed milled on the outer surfaces. If you needed hollow parts they can be milled in sections. The pumpkins made on the ARM-10 would have been quite involved to try and mill, therefore, ideal for ARM-10. As your parts shown are quite small you could print a complete little plane. I would probably do the wheels and prop separately so I could pin then on so they moved.

Hope this helps.
Patrick Thorn
Premier Consultant - 3D Technology
Roland DG UK Ltd

http://www.rolanddg.co.uk

User avatar
Andrew Dudley
Gold Member
Posts: 438
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 10:04 am
Location: Clevedon - England
Contact:

Re: Learning about 3D Printing/Milling

Post by Andrew Dudley » Thu Dec 04, 2014 11:50 am

Hi Ed,

As Patrick suggested the milling machine would be more useful in creating your parts from wood. The wings, tail and pop are all 2.5 shapes, so if you have some wood that is the correct thickness you can just profile cut these, nice and easy.
The fusilage is a little more complex. You could cut this in 2 parts (top and bottom), and then glue them together. Or you could create a frame arround the shape and do some 2 sided milling, using positioning pins.

This video shows the idea of using positioning pins.

The 'head' would be better 3D printed as Patrick suggested. It is much easier, however if you had a machine with a 4th axis (MDX-40A for example) then this would also be fairly easily milled on the same machine out of wood.
Andrew Dudley
Business Manager - 3D & Dental
Roland DG (UK) Ltd
Web: www.rolanddg.co.uk

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest